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Town Car.

In English, "Town Car" is a literal translation of the French term "Sedan de Ville", a nameplate introduced by Cadillac in 1956. Both names refer to a classic style of limousine popular in the 1920s which had an open chauffeur's compartment in the front. While the Cadillac was a styled as a four-door hardtop, Lincoln made its modern models visually suggest their older namesakes. Many examples from the 1970s and 1980s had a vinyl roof style that swept down the center pillar as part of a raised molding, complete with opera lamps, suggesting a partition between front and rear seats while no vinyl was applied to the front section of the roof over the driver. Other models had a full-length vinyl roof.

The Town Car name first appeared in the Lincoln line in 1922, on a custom-built Lincoln made for Henry Ford. The name reappeared in 1959, on a special limousine-like version of the Lincoln Continental Mark IV; it was available only in black and was identifiable by a unique padded vinyl top, a rarity at that time. After 1959, the Town Car name went dormant for 10 years, reemerging as an interior option package for the 1969 Lincoln Continental. It next appeared as a trim option in 1970 ("Continental's Town Car Interior option", to quote from the 1970 deluxe catalog), and thereafter continued through 1980 as the top-line trim option package for the Lincoln Continental. Again, the Town Car trim featured an extra plush interior (Media velour cloth) along with more standard equipment. The Town Car badge has always been applied to sedans, but from 1973 to 1981, there was a similar option for coupes called the Lincoln Continental Town Coupe.

In 1981, the Town Car became a separate model from the Continental in preparation for further downsizing of the latter; aside from the closely related Continental Mark VI, it became the last full-size Lincoln in the lineup. Since its introduction, there have been three generations of the Town Car, introduced in 1981, 1990, and 1998. Each of these received a substantial refresh approximately halfway through its production cycle, in 1985, 1995, and 2003.

Third generation (1998–2011)

For the 1998 model year, Ford gave its full-size cars for all three divisions major redesigns, with the Town Car receiving the most attention. The straight-lined body seen for eight years gave way to a curved design scheme with a downwards sloping trunk lid, and cat's-eye headlights. The C-pillar opera windows and Rolls-Royce grille seen since the 1970s were left off, as was the hood ornament. In the front, the new Town Car wore a waterfall grille much like the Navigator that was introduced alongside it for 1998. While it lost 3 in (76 mm) in overall length, the new Town Car was 2 in (51 mm) wider, 1 in (25 mm) taller, with a slightly longer wheelbase as well.

The interior received major changes as well. Door and instrument panels as well as the radio face, switches and controls were redone. Additional wood trim was added to the newly designed dashboard and the door panels. The power seat recliner and lumbar controls were moved to the door panels. Lincoln emblems remained on the door panels and the seatbacks, as well as the rear tail lights, making the 1998–2002 models the last Town Cars with that feature. The Cartier model also received a 220 hp (164 kW) version of the Modular V8.

Seat-mounted combination head and torso side airbags became standard during the 1999 model year. In late 2000, the Touring Edition featured a more powerful 235 hp (175 kW) version of the Town Car's Modular V8 engine, dual exhaust pipes and unique 16" alloy wheels with larger tires.

According to Consumer Guide the car scores above average in the premium luxury segments for comfort, room, and materials but scores below average for acceleration, steering and overall technical performance. Otherwise, the Town Car has frequently received negative reviews with the car being considered "out of date." The Town Car is, however, still considered one of the best chauffeured vehicles, as it receives high marks for being among the most comfortable, quiet riding and roomiest luxury cars available. Forbes car writer Jerry Flint attributes the Town Car's falling sales since the 1998 redesign to the reduction in length and smaller trunk.

Movie Story

This vehicle is used by Alice's father.

Sources

Malice in Wonderland
Film Malice in Wonderland (2009)
Characters Alice Dodgson - Whitey - Felix Chester - Harry Hunt - Doochey - Gonzo - Hattie - Caterpillar- Hooker - Rex - Midge - Dean and Dom - Griffin - Mrs. Jones - Bag Lady - Jack/Jacqui - Mo - Mother - Louis Dodgson - Newsreader - Swede
Locations Wonderland - Subway Station - Rabbit Hole - Amusement Park - Food Truck - Bus Stop - Telephone Booth - The Caterpillar's Car - Convenience Store - Doochey Mansion - Garden Maze - Hattie's - Nowhere - The Royal Motel - Hearts - Drink Me - Hulme Street
Music Malice in Wonderland - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Terms/Concepts For Your Head - Traumatic Brain Injury
Vehicles Lincoln Town Car Stretched Limousine - LTI Fairway - LDV Convoy - Custom Made Clown Car - DAF 95 XF - Austin Maestro 500 - Jaguar XJ6 (XJ40)

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